LCCT-KLIA TRAVEL & TOURS


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Testimonial

“ A Taxi service with a child seat in KL - our experience ”

08 November 2011, 20:09

As a young family with an 18 month old daughter, we were a bit worried about the taxis around KL, especially the longer trips to and from the airport. We didn't really want to lug around a child seat for our 2 weeks holiday not hire a car with one in and around KL ( but we we did in Langkawi).

After raising a post on TA we finally came across some advice from other travellers, with Paki Sufi's taxi service being recommended.

Paki Sufi offers a genuine taxi service but also with the option of a child car seat! He was quick in replying to emails, and was easy to deal with in arranging taxis to and from LCCT airport.

Our driver on 4 occasions was Radzi and he was excellent, drove carefully and spoke excellent English. We ended up with a premier taxi and it was great - with Radzi waiting for us at the terminal and right on time - if not early - when picking us up from the hotels.

We highly recommend Paki Sufi's services, especially if you are like us and wanted peace of mind of a child seat for your infant or toddler.

Please PM me if you want more details.
 
 
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SUGGESTED ITINERARY

Morning
St Peter's Church
Afternoon
Portuguese Settlement
Afternoon
Malacca Museum



 

 
Melaka is located on the Western Coast of Peninsular Malaysia facing the Straits of Melaka, about 147 kilometers from Kuala Lumpur and 245 kilometers from Singpore. Melaka is actually found sandwiched between the states of Negeri Sembilan and Johor. It can be reached by excellent roads from Kuala Lumpur and Singapore. Internally it is serviced by a very good network of roads leading to all the historical places of interest. It covers and area of 658 square kilometers and is divided into three districts namely Alor Gajah, Melaka Tengah and Jasin.

Melaka was founded by Parameswara (or Raja Iskandar) the last Malay ruler of Temasik (ancient Singapore) in 1396 when he and his followers retreated up the straits to Muar, then to Sungai Ujung before settling at Bertam near the estuary of Melaka River.

Finding the place of strategic location, he decided to make a permanent settlement there, naming it "Melaka" after the name of the tree he leaned against.

The Melaka Sultanate occupies a special position in the history of Malaysia. Its inauguration marked the beginning of the emergence of a new Malay empire. The birthplace of the Malay Sultanates and Malaysia's historic city, Melaka provided the stage on which the Portuguese, Dutch and English played out their roles in shaping the history.

Melaka emerged as a strong maritime trading state under the industrious Parameswara and his chiefs. Melaka also began to be noticed by Muslim traders from West Asia and India, who until that period, had been concentrating their activities in Aru, Pedir and Pasai en-route to the East, especially China. Because of its strategic location straddling the Straits of Melaka, it thrived as a port-of-call and a centre of entrepot trade with ships and merchants from China, Japan, India, Arab and South Africa.

In 1511, it fell to the hands of the Portuguese, followed by the Dutch in 1641 after a fierce battle. In 1795, Melaka was given to the British to prevent it falling to the French when the Netherlands was captured during the Napoleonic Wars. It was returned to the Dutch in 1818 under the treaty of Vienna but was later exchanged by the British for Bangkahulu, Sumatra. From 1826 onwards, the British East India Company along with Singapore and Penang governed it, under the Straits Settlement administration in Calcutta.

The Dutch, who held Melaka for over a century, left many fine buildings marking their heritage. The most imposing relic of the Dutch period is the Stadthuys, a strikingly pink town hall which is today the oldest Dutch building in the Far East. Right next to it stands the bright red Christ Church, constructed with pink bricks imported from Holland and covered with local red lacerite. Today, these buildings together with the ruins of the Portuguese built A Famosa and St. Paul's Church are the most prominent reminders of the Europeans' presence in Melaka.

After World War II, anti-colonial sentiment bred in the country among the nationalists, the result of which was the proclamation of Independence by Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra, Malaysia's first Prime Minister, at the Padang Pahlawan (Warrior's Field) at Bandar Hilir, Melaka on 20 February 1956.
 
MALACCA SUGGESTED ITINERARY

Historical Malacca brings you from Kuala Lumpur to Malaysia’s historical city where you’ll catch some amazing sights of heritage buildings and ancient landmarks. Start with a visit to St. Peter’s Church which was built in 1710, the oldest in the country that is still being used today. Then, visit the 17th Century Chinese Hill before stopping at its foothill to view the Sultan’s Well before going through a Portuguese settlement.
 
 
Next proceed to view the famous gateway of Porta De Santiago and the ruins of St. Paul’s Church that is lined with 17th Century Dutch tombstones.
 
 
 
Next up is the Red Square – a salmon pink Dutch administrative building that now houses the Malacca Museum and government offices.
 
  
 
Then visit Christchurch before breaking for lunch, then resuming with a trip to the Cheng Hoon Teng Temple, the oldest active temple in the country. Finally, take a stroll along Jonker Street, a heritage street lined with shop houses that ends at the banks of the Malacca River.
 







Testimonial

“ Recommending a taxi with a baby seat - so rare! ”

Jan 07, 2011, 8:36 PM

My husband, one year old daughter and I just came through KL and I'm very pleased to recommend a taxi driver who has a baby seat. This took some serious research because it's really rare to find a taxi with a baby seat in KL, but we had a really good experience so I thought I would pass on the details for any other concerned parents who would like their child safely buckled in!

Pak Sufi is a warm, friendly man, speaks excellent english and is a safe driver so we felt very confident having him take us to and from the airport. He was also very forgiving when our daughter was ill in his car - he stopped on the side of the road a couple of times for us and was so understanding (he has grandchildren so happily said he was used to it), despite the fact that it must have been quite unpleasant for him!

His rates are very reasonable (it cost us MR 85 each way from the airport to KL centre) and we highly recommend him. Pak Sufi's website is: www.taxi-lcct.com
 

 
 
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